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QuickPic is a Fast, Free Gallery Replacement for Android



Avatar for Alan Henry

Alan Henry
QuickPic is a Fast, Free Gallery Replacement for Android Android: If you’re looking for a fast and feature-rich alternative to the default Android gallery, QuickPic can get the job done. The app allows you to browse and edit images quickly, and even perform batch operations against multiple photos on your SD card.

QuickPic is a Fast, Free Gallery Replacement for Android QuickPic’s best feature is that it’s fast, and can completely replace the default Android Gallery app if you want it to. It doesn’t have the transitions and flare that the default app does, but it loads images quickly, and if you need to change, move, copy, or hide images in your gallery, the app allows you to. Just long-press on any image to see all of the editing options available.

If you have multiple images to move, or you want to move several images into a new gallery, just select them all and tap the menu button or long-press on any one of them. QuickPic is also a robust batch image editing tool, and gives you the ability to manage an entire gallery on your Android phone at once.

QuickPic is a Fast, Free Gallery Replacement for Android Even if QuickPic were just fast, it would be worth checking out. The fact that you can quickly and easy manage your gallery and edit images makes the app well worth a download. QuickPic is free and available now in the Android App Market.

QuickPic is a Fast, Free Gallery Replacement for AndroidQuickPic | Android Market


You can follow Alan Henry, the author of this post, on Twitter.

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Android Central Editors' app picks for May 21, 2011 | Android Central

 Weekly Apps

Apps, apps and more apps! It’s an appapalooza! And appstravaganza! It’s appstronomical! OK. We’ll quit while we’re behind. But we’re back with another week’s worth of app picks, so slide on past the break and see what we’ve chosen this week.

Jerry Hildenbrand – USA Today tablet edition (free)

USA Today

As a recent tablet convert, I’m realizing that they are perfect for consumption. Web browsing, Twitter, and reading the news are perfect use cases for a big slab of glass and touch controls. Granted, a lot of my news reading habits are pretty specific, but for general “soft” news I find myself opening the USA Today tablet app daily. The layout and function makes great use of my Tab 10.1′s big screen, the controls are laid out well, and visually, the app is awesome. On the left pane is your list of stories, separated into categories you can select via tabs at the top. A quick button tap takes you a video browser or photo gallery, and with one press you can open a full article for reading on the entire screen. I highly recommend this one for anyone with a Honeycomb tablet, of any variety. It’s free on the Android Market, and needs Android 3.0 or higher. [Market Link]

Chris Parsons – Duckhunt (free)

Duckhunt

I’m an ’80s kid. and as such, I rocked the heck out of the Nintendo Entertainment System when it first launched. While there are plenty of 8-bit wonders out there these days, nothing beats the classics. Super Mario Brothers, Donkey Kong, Ice Climber, Excite Bike — but none of those more awesome then Duck Hunt. That mean ol’ dog just drove me nuts as a kid, always mocking me when I missed.. making me always fire the gun in frustration. Sadly, I no longer have a working NES — but, that’s not a problem these days since available in the Android Market is an awesome port of Duck Hunt plus, it’s free. If you’re an ’80s kid like me, head on over to the Android Market and grab it, now. [Market Link]

Joshua Munoz – xkcdViewer (free)

xkcd

Sometimes checking the latest comic isn’t at the forefront of my mind, so when I need to get caught up, I turn to xkcdViewer. It’s a pretty simple, no-frills app, but it gets the job done giving me an xkcd fix when necessary. It loads the latest comic by default, and from there you can favorite certain comic strips, navigate forward or backward with the arrow keys, or even jump to a comic at random. There’s also the option to search by title and tapping the comic gives you whatever zinger mouseover text would usually be found on the website. It’s a solid choice for any xkcd fan, and really, if you’re reading about Android, you’re probably reading xkcd, too. [Market Link]

Anndrew Vacca – FREEdi Youtube Downloader (free, Amazon Appstore)

Youtube Downloader

FREEdi Youtube Downloader is a great app that, despite the awful name, has skyrocketed to become the fourth most popular free app on the Amazon Appstore. FREEdi lets you download Youtube videos straight to your phone or tablet in either MP3, MP4, or AAC formats. Simply search for a video through the FREEdi interface, and long click to download. Once complete, the videos are stored within the app, giving you offline access that really comes in handy during those long subway commutes. Unfortunately, the interface isn’t nearly as clean as the native Youtube app, and there’s a slight (OK, large) chance that the app might be pulled. But if having your own collection of Youtube videos is your cup of tea, grab it while it’s hot (and available). [Amazon Market Link]

Menno – Chalk Ball (€1.49)

Chalk Ball

One part Brick Breaker, one part JezzBall, I find Chalk Ball to be more addicting than any simple game has a right to be. You have a limited amount of “Chalk” and you have to use it to keep the ball from dropping off the bottom of the screen. Making a line requires chalk, so if you just do a line across the whole bottom every time, you’ll quickly run out of chalk and watch helplessly as the ball falls off your screen. Above your line, chalk dots will appear, and hitting those will refill your chalk reserves. As the game progresses, different dots will appear, some of them refilling your reserves completely, while others will clone your ball for you. It’s deceptively simple, but a lot of fun. There is a full version available, but if you want to try it for longer than 15 minutes, look up Chalk Ball Light in the marketplace. [Market Link]

Alex Dobie – GTasks (free, premium)

Gtasks

Proper Gmail Tasks integration is something that’s still missing from Android, and GTasks is an excellent app that plugs this gap, allowing you to manage all your tasks on the go. The app synchronizes with your Google account, pulling down any existing tasks, and offers the same functionality that you get in the Gmail desktop interface, only with a vastly superior UI. Swiping left and right takes you between task lists, and other options for synchronization and clearing completed tasks can be accessed via the menu button. There’s even the option to add notification reminders to your tasks, which is a great way to make sure you don’t lose track of important deadlines. The basic, ad-supported version of GTasks is free, but the ads can be disabled by purchasing a key for around $7. [Market Link]

Sean Brunett – TiVoRemote (free)

TIVO

Do you have a TiVo and often misplace the remotes? Or are you just lazy enough that you don’t want to get off the couch to get them? If you download TiVoRemote you don’t have to worry about any of those because you can control your TiVo right from your Android device. This app works with TiVo Series 3, HD or Premiere; it does not work with Series 2. Other features include the ability to add multiple DVRs, shortcuts for easy Guide filters and channel access. Both of the devices must be on the same WiFi network as that is how they communicate. It takes about 5 minutes to set up, but once it’s done it works great. The remote is very usable and it’s nice to be able to just have your phone or tablet and control your TiVo box. The app is $0.99 in the Android Market and in my opinion worth every penny. [Market Link]

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Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 review (Google IO special edition

 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

There’s kind of no easy way to say this without insulting one of the year’s most important pieces of Android tech, so we’re just going to come out and say it:

Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 is what Android 3.0 Honeycomb should have launched on.

There. We said it. But it’s true. As important as the Motorola Xoom was (and is) to Android and Honeycomb tablets as platforms, it left a bit to be desired in the design department. And so it’s almost fitting that Samsung, the company that brought us the 7-inch Galaxy Tab last fall — basically an oversized Froyo smartphone — is about to launch a little slice of sexy in the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

But the story’s not that simple, is it? Join us after the break as we break down the special edition Galaxy Tab 10.1 handed out at Google IO.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 Specs | Galaxy Tab 10.1 ForumsHow to root the Galaxy Tab 10.1

A long, strange trip to the 10.1

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 at Mobile World Congress
Galaxy Tab 10.1 at Mobile World Congress in February 2011

We’re not too proud to admit that we’ve had a slightly confusing time leading up to the current iteration of the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Flash back to mid-February 2011, at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, when Samsung first announced the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Thinner and lighter than the Motorola Xoom, which at the time was the only other Honeycomb tablet, we had no problem declaring that “this Galaxy Tab definitely takes Sammy into the next generation of Android tablets.” Because it did. (Check out our hands-on with the Galaxy Tab 10.1 at MWC.)

But then something happened, just a couple weeks later. The iPad 2 was announced. Not that we didn’t all know it was coming, but it made the Xoom look quite beastly, and the Galaxy Tab 10.1, well, a little boring. And stories started to come out that Samsung likely was already looking to revamp the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

 Galaxy Tab 10.1 at CTIA
The new Galaxy Tab 10.1 at CTIA in March 2011

Enter CTIA 2011, in Orlando, just a couple weeks after the iPad 2 announcement. Samsung not only announced an 8.9-inch tablet, but that the Galaxy 10.1 “went back to the drawing board … to create the thinnest and lightest large-screen tablet in the industry.” The timing is intriguing. There’s no way that the revamped Galaxy Tab went from inception to prototype in just a couple weeks — Samsung must have already had this in the works.

And we got a quick look at the new Galaxy Tab 10.1 — behind glass.

That brings us the Google IO developer conference in mid-May. On the first day of the event, upon announcing Android 3.1, Google handed out special edition Galaxy Tab 10.1s to everyone at Moscone West. And that’s what we present to you now.

The hardware

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 given out at Google IO — GT-P7510 — indeed is a special-edition device. The box sports the Google IO logo, and there’ s a big “NOT FOR SALE” notice on the bottom. You won’t be getting one of these in stores. But you will be getting the same form factor and guts when its goes on sale  June 8.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 Google IO EditionGalaxy Tab 10.1 Google IO Edition

It’s thin. It’s 8.6mm thin. It’s light. 595 grams light. And compared to the Motorola Xoom, it’s night and day.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the Motorola Xoom

The Galaxy Tab actually is a few millimeters wider and taller than the Xoom. But as is the case these days, that larger size is mitigated by the Tab’s thinness. (We saw the same thing in the Samsung Infuse 4G smartphone. Big, but thin.)

The front of the Galaxy Tab is completely smooth. As is the case with Honeycomb tablets, there are no buttons to be seen. The home-menu-back-search buttons have all moved to software. So all you’ve got is the 10.1-inch screen (at 1280×800 resolution), and a little speck of a 1.3MP front-facing camera. There’s no notification light, which is par for the course for Samsung devices now.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The screen itself is decent enough, but we’re quickly starting to want a higher resolution. First-world problems, we know, but individual pixels are readily apparently. That’s not a deal-breaker, and it really doesn’t take away from an otherwise good experience with the Galaxy Tab. But for otherwise having the form factor nailed, it’d be a feature that would really give it a boost.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The Galaxy Tab has nicely rounded corners, like the Xoom. There are no sharp edges to be found. But the feel is very different. Whereas the Xoom has a metal and soft-touch back, the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is all plastic. (That’s another change from the version we first saw at Mobile World Congress, too.) The back of our special edition Tab is done in an Android robot motif, with a silver sliver jutting into it. That’s where you’ll find the 3.2MP camera and flash.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The top bezel houses the 3.5mm headphone jack, power button and volume rocker. We like having the power button on the side (even if most Samsung smartphones now have it on the right-hand bezel). But the volume rocker can take a little getting used to. On the Xoom, it’s vertical, on the left-hand bezel. So you press up for volume up, and down for volume down. But when holding the Galaxy Tab in the landscape position, as you’ll likely be doing most of the time, the volume rocker is horizontal on the top bezel. So left is volume-down, and right is volume up. That actually coincides with the on-screen volume indicator, which also is horizontal. But after we don’t know how many smartphones and tablets we’ve used with a vertical volume rocker on the side of the device, we’re having to retrain our brains a little.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The bottom bezel has the proprietary connector, which you’ll use to charge the Galaxy Tab, or connect it to a computer (or, eventually, accessories). The good news is that you don’t need a separate cable for charging. The bad news is you need Samsung’s rather large plug to charge the thing. Trade-offs.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

There’s a little pinhole microphone down there, as well as a couple of plastic circles covering the screws that hold the whole thing together. Toss in the single speaker on each side bezel — and the speakers are pretty good, but not as good as on the Xoom — and that’s it for the industrial design.

Samsung hasn’t necessarily done anything extraordinary here — it’s your basic tablet design, right? It’s got the same basic shape as every other Honeycomb tablet we’ve used. But it’s the little things — namely the simple, clean lines and thinness — that stand out in the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

What’s under the hood

There’s not a whole lot to say here that we haven’t said already. The Galaxy Tab 10.1 uses the same architecture as the other Honeycomb tablets we’ve used thus far — NVIDIA’s Tegra 2 1GHz system on a chip. And it’s as speedy as it ever was. Undoubtedly Samsung’s done a few tweaks, but we really don’t see much of a speed difference over the Xoom, at least not in everyday use.

Our unit here is a 32GB version — there will be 16GB versions as well. There’s no swapable microSD card, which might bother you. Or it might not. We’ve got 725MB of useable RAM, which is working quite well, thank you very much, and we’ve got 1GB of program memory. Apps, of course, can be moved to the internal storage should we use that up.

As for battery life, it’s got a 7,000mAh power source crammed into that thin form factor, and we’re easily getting a day’s use out of it. That’ll vary if you’re watching video, of course. But for basic browsing, Twitter use and e-mail –and some Angry Birds — you should get a day, easy.

The software

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

Not a whole lot to say here that hasn’t been said already. The Google IO special-edition Galaxy Tab 10.1 runs Android 3.0.1, and it’ll be getting an upgrade to Android 3.1, with its suite of new APIs — and, more important, the ability to stream Google Movies.

Otherwise, you’ve got a stock Honeycomb experience. No skinning, and only a couple of apps loaded by default, including Samsung’s Music Hub and Samsung Apps, Pulse and Quickoffice.

While we’ve got your attention, though, allow us this brief rant: Netflix needs to open itself the hell up and get on this tablet, ASAP. No ifs, ands or buts. It’s the perfect form factor, and the perfect size.

We’re not going to worry too much about any bugs on this version of the Galaxy Tab. It’s a special edition and clearly labeled as a developer unit. That’s the price you pay for a free pre-release tablet, and one we’re sure most of you would gladly pay.

The cameras

Funny story about the Google IO edition Galaxy Tab as a camera. It was given out the afternoon of the first day of the conference. That evening, Google threw its big party, with Jane’s Addiction performing. And while we’re quite used to seeing cell phones up in the air at a concert, it’s seeing a couple hundred 10-inch tablets held aloft (with two hands, of course) during the better parts of “Ritual de lo Habitual” was one of the most gloriously geeky things we’ve experienced.

But we digress. …

Testing tablet cameras is kind of like eating fast food — we’re left wondering why we did it when it’s said and done. In all likelihood, you’re not going to be doing a lot of shooting with the rear camera on a 10-inch device. Here’s a novel idea — lose the rear-facing camera and up the quality on the front-facing camera. Want us to start doing more video chatting on a tablet? Give us a little better quality on the front camera. It doesn’t even need to be 8MP or anything. Just a little better.

But we digress. …

Images below open in full size in a new window

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera testSamsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera test

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera testSamsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera test

The wrap-up

We said it at the outset, and we stand by it still. The (latest) Galaxy Tab 10.1 has the form factor that we wish Honeycomb had debuted on. That’s really not a knock against the Motorola Xoom — something had to be first, and we really don’t know what kind of time constraints went into development of the Xoom and the release of Honeycomb.

But Samsung has slimmed down the Galaxy Tab enough, and made it light enough, to make it a much more viable option. And Samsung did us a solid by actually announcing price and availability at CTIA. Come June 8, you’ll be able to get the 16GB version for $499, and the 32GB version for $599. No, it’s not cheap. But it’s in line with the the other 10.1-inch Honeycomb tablets.

What would we change? At this point, not a whole lot. Maybe a keyboard dock like the ASUS EeePad Transformer, but Samsung’s well capable of bringing something along those lines.

Point is, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 deserves your attention.

Related Android Posts:

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 review (Google IO special edition

 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

There’s kind of no easy way to say this without insulting one of the year’s most important pieces of Android tech, so we’re just going to come out and say it:

Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 is what Android 3.0 Honeycomb should have launched on.

There. We said it. But it’s true. As important as the Motorola Xoom was (and is) to Android and Honeycomb tablets as platforms, it left a bit to be desired in the design department. And so it’s almost fitting that Samsung, the company that brought us the 7-inch Galaxy Tab last fall — basically an oversized Froyo smartphone — is about to launch a little slice of sexy in the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

But the story’s not that simple, is it? Join us after the break as we break down the special edition Galaxy Tab 10.1 handed out at Google IO.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 Specs | Galaxy Tab 10.1 ForumsHow to root the Galaxy Tab 10.1

A long, strange trip to the 10.1

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 at Mobile World Congress
Galaxy Tab 10.1 at Mobile World Congress in February 2011

We’re not too proud to admit that we’ve had a slightly confusing time leading up to the current iteration of the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Flash back to mid-February 2011, at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, when Samsung first announced the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Thinner and lighter than the Motorola Xoom, which at the time was the only other Honeycomb tablet, we had no problem declaring that “this Galaxy Tab definitely takes Sammy into the next generation of Android tablets.” Because it did. (Check out our hands-on with the Galaxy Tab 10.1 at MWC.)

But then something happened, just a couple weeks later. The iPad 2 was announced. Not that we didn’t all know it was coming, but it made the Xoom look quite beastly, and the Galaxy Tab 10.1, well, a little boring. And stories started to come out that Samsung likely was already looking to revamp the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

 Galaxy Tab 10.1 at CTIA
The new Galaxy Tab 10.1 at CTIA in March 2011

Enter CTIA 2011, in Orlando, just a couple weeks after the iPad 2 announcement. Samsung not only announced an 8.9-inch tablet, but that the Galaxy 10.1 “went back to the drawing board … to create the thinnest and lightest large-screen tablet in the industry.” The timing is intriguing. There’s no way that the revamped Galaxy Tab went from inception to prototype in just a couple weeks — Samsung must have already had this in the works.

And we got a quick look at the new Galaxy Tab 10.1 — behind glass.

That brings us the Google IO developer conference in mid-May. On the first day of the event, upon announcing Android 3.1, Google handed out special edition Galaxy Tab 10.1s to everyone at Moscone West. And that’s what we present to you now.

The hardware

The Galaxy Tab 10.1 given out at Google IO — GT-P7510 — indeed is a special-edition device. The box sports the Google IO logo, and there’ s a big “NOT FOR SALE” notice on the bottom. You won’t be getting one of these in stores. But you will be getting the same form factor and guts when its goes on sale  June 8.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 Google IO EditionGalaxy Tab 10.1 Google IO Edition

It’s thin. It’s 8.6mm thin. It’s light. 595 grams light. And compared to the Motorola Xoom, it’s night and day.

Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the Motorola Xoom

The Galaxy Tab actually is a few millimeters wider and taller than the Xoom. But as is the case these days, that larger size is mitigated by the Tab’s thinness. (We saw the same thing in the Samsung Infuse 4G smartphone. Big, but thin.)

The front of the Galaxy Tab is completely smooth. As is the case with Honeycomb tablets, there are no buttons to be seen. The home-menu-back-search buttons have all moved to software. So all you’ve got is the 10.1-inch screen (at 1280×800 resolution), and a little speck of a 1.3MP front-facing camera. There’s no notification light, which is par for the course for Samsung devices now.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The screen itself is decent enough, but we’re quickly starting to want a higher resolution. First-world problems, we know, but individual pixels are readily apparently. That’s not a deal-breaker, and it really doesn’t take away from an otherwise good experience with the Galaxy Tab. But for otherwise having the form factor nailed, it’d be a feature that would really give it a boost.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The Galaxy Tab has nicely rounded corners, like the Xoom. There are no sharp edges to be found. But the feel is very different. Whereas the Xoom has a metal and soft-touch back, the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is all plastic. (That’s another change from the version we first saw at Mobile World Congress, too.) The back of our special edition Tab is done in an Android robot motif, with a silver sliver jutting into it. That’s where you’ll find the 3.2MP camera and flash.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The top bezel houses the 3.5mm headphone jack, power button and volume rocker. We like having the power button on the side (even if most Samsung smartphones now have it on the right-hand bezel). But the volume rocker can take a little getting used to. On the Xoom, it’s vertical, on the left-hand bezel. So you press up for volume up, and down for volume down. But when holding the Galaxy Tab in the landscape position, as you’ll likely be doing most of the time, the volume rocker is horizontal on the top bezel. So left is volume-down, and right is volume up. That actually coincides with the on-screen volume indicator, which also is horizontal. But after we don’t know how many smartphones and tablets we’ve used with a vertical volume rocker on the side of the device, we’re having to retrain our brains a little.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

The bottom bezel has the proprietary connector, which you’ll use to charge the Galaxy Tab, or connect it to a computer (or, eventually, accessories). The good news is that you don’t need a separate cable for charging. The bad news is you need Samsung’s rather large plug to charge the thing. Trade-offs.

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

There’s a little pinhole microphone down there, as well as a couple of plastic circles covering the screws that hold the whole thing together. Toss in the single speaker on each side bezel — and the speakers are pretty good, but not as good as on the Xoom — and that’s it for the industrial design.

Samsung hasn’t necessarily done anything extraordinary here — it’s your basic tablet design, right? It’s got the same basic shape as every other Honeycomb tablet we’ve used. But it’s the little things — namely the simple, clean lines and thinness — that stand out in the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

What’s under the hood

There’s not a whole lot to say here that we haven’t said already. The Galaxy Tab 10.1 uses the same architecture as the other Honeycomb tablets we’ve used thus far — NVIDIA’s Tegra 2 1GHz system on a chip. And it’s as speedy as it ever was. Undoubtedly Samsung’s done a few tweaks, but we really don’t see much of a speed difference over the Xoom, at least not in everyday use.

Our unit here is a 32GB version — there will be 16GB versions as well. There’s no swapable microSD card, which might bother you. Or it might not. We’ve got 725MB of useable RAM, which is working quite well, thank you very much, and we’ve got 1GB of program memory. Apps, of course, can be moved to the internal storage should we use that up.

As for battery life, it’s got a 7,000mAh power source crammed into that thin form factor, and we’re easily getting a day’s use out of it. That’ll vary if you’re watching video, of course. But for basic browsing, Twitter use and e-mail –and some Angry Birds — you should get a day, easy.

The software

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

Not a whole lot to say here that hasn’t been said already. The Google IO special-edition Galaxy Tab 10.1 runs Android 3.0.1, and it’ll be getting an upgrade to Android 3.1, with its suite of new APIs — and, more important, the ability to stream Google Movies.

Otherwise, you’ve got a stock Honeycomb experience. No skinning, and only a couple of apps loaded by default, including Samsung’s Music Hub and Samsung Apps, Pulse and Quickoffice.

While we’ve got your attention, though, allow us this brief rant: Netflix needs to open itself the hell up and get on this tablet, ASAP. No ifs, ands or buts. It’s the perfect form factor, and the perfect size.

We’re not going to worry too much about any bugs on this version of the Galaxy Tab. It’s a special edition and clearly labeled as a developer unit. That’s the price you pay for a free pre-release tablet, and one we’re sure most of you would gladly pay.

The cameras

Funny story about the Google IO edition Galaxy Tab as a camera. It was given out the afternoon of the first day of the conference. That evening, Google threw its big party, with Jane’s Addiction performing. And while we’re quite used to seeing cell phones up in the air at a concert, it’s seeing a couple hundred 10-inch tablets held aloft (with two hands, of course) during the better parts of “Ritual de lo Habitual” was one of the most gloriously geeky things we’ve experienced.

But we digress. …

Testing tablet cameras is kind of like eating fast food — we’re left wondering why we did it when it’s said and done. In all likelihood, you’re not going to be doing a lot of shooting with the rear camera on a 10-inch device. Here’s a novel idea — lose the rear-facing camera and up the quality on the front-facing camera. Want us to start doing more video chatting on a tablet? Give us a little better quality on the front camera. It doesn’t even need to be 8MP or anything. Just a little better.

But we digress. …

Images below open in full size in a new window

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera testSamsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera test

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera testSamsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 camera test

The wrap-up

We said it at the outset, and we stand by it still. The (latest) Galaxy Tab 10.1 has the form factor that we wish Honeycomb had debuted on. That’s really not a knock against the Motorola Xoom — something had to be first, and we really don’t know what kind of time constraints went into development of the Xoom and the release of Honeycomb.

But Samsung has slimmed down the Galaxy Tab enough, and made it light enough, to make it a much more viable option. And Samsung did us a solid by actually announcing price and availability at CTIA. Come June 8, you’ll be able to get the 16GB version for $499, and the 32GB version for $599. No, it’s not cheap. But it’s in line with the the other 10.1-inch Honeycomb tablets.

What would we change? At this point, not a whole lot. Maybe a keyboard dock like the ASUS EeePad Transformer, but Samsung’s well capable of bringing something along those lines.

Point is, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 deserves your attention.

Related Android Posts:

World's First Ever Android Clamshell Phone

Guess what – Sharp has just made an attention-grabbing announcement regarding their very own Android smartphone. Sharp’s smartphone will be named as the Aquos Hybrid 007sh, which is also the first ever Android clamshell phone. Sharp is trying to catch everyone’s attention and this will certainly bring something “new” to the world of Android. We know one thing – it’ll certainly be super popular in Asia, and in particular Japan and Korea. While the phone certainly looks a bit old-fashioned – believe it or not – it’s still equipped with remarkably impressive specs.

Who wouldn’t want a phone powered by a 1GHz next generation Snapdragon processor,  with a front-facing camera (the resolution still unknown) and a 16-megapixel rear camera? Plus, its already furnished with pre-installed apps such as Dropbox and Qik app for you own delight. Additionally, it will feature a 3.4 inch flippable touch screen invigorated with a 3D ready display and a 3D TV Tuner. Although the device has a retro look to it, and seems like it might be running an older version of Android, it’s not – it’s got Android 2.3! Cool!

The Aquos Hybrid 007sh will be launched in Japan first. If it will become a smash hit, it will sell worldwide. There’s actually a good chance that this phone will sell well, and we are very keen to get our hands on one to do some photo/video testing. 16MP camera on a phone? Oh yeah. The question now is  – can it go along and shatter the hype of the Galaxy S II? Sharp is crossing their fingers hoping it will.

Honestly, the phone seems a little bit strange but I can’t argue more with its specs – they are indeed impressive. If given a chance to acquire this phone, would you?

Source: Android Guys

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Android Market's new movie rental service blocked from rooted

Biggest GoogleFail ever

We can’t make this up people.  According to Google, who gets to make the rules since it’s their service, rooted devices are not supported by the Android Markets new movie rental service “due to requirements related to copyright protection”.  You’ll even see a specific error message when you attempt to try — “Failed to fetch license for [movie title] (error 49)”. 

So now people who root their phones, whether to get rid of the crap “open” that’s forced down their throats, or to have a current version of Android, are punished and lumped in with folks who steal movies.  Nice move, Google.  That makes me want to buy more of your products and use more of your services, so I can be treated like a criminal just because I’m smart enough to get rid of CityID, or want a safe version of Android on my phone.  And of course, I’d much rather steal movies streamed with a poor bitrate at a low resolution to my phone than use Google to search out any of the thousands of places where I could steal them using my computer. Facepalm.

Of course, the Android community will find a way around this.  I already have some ideas, and I’m sure others will, too.  But we shouldn’t have to.  And once we do, I’ll download one (and only one) movie from the Market for the satisfaction of defeating this stupid move by Google, then be sure to never use the service again.  Redbox doesn’t care if I want to run a custom ROM on my phone, so they’ll get my $4.00.

Source: Android Market supportThanks, Joshua!

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Samsung Infuse 4G Spider Commercial Makes Us Scream & Laugh

It doesn’t happen too often, but ATT has put out a hilarious spider commercial for the new Samsung Infuse 4G Android smartphone featuring the high end 4.5? Super AMOLED display that, if commercials are to be believed, will cause your coworkers to freak out.

 

In the Samsung Infuse 4G Spider commercial, a prankster puts his new Infuse 4G down on the table with a spider on the display and scares a coworker, but thankfully “Dave” is ready with his shoe. Unfortunately, the Infuse 4G doesn’t look like it can withstand a hammering by Dave’s shoe.

 

Samsung Infuse 4G Spider commercials ATT

Samsung Infuse 4G Spider – So Real You’ll Freak

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Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android



Avatar for Adam Dachis

Adam Dachis
Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes AndroidWe love both mobile operating systems and their corresponding devices, but just like Android has its many advantages so does iOS. Here are our favorite parts of iOS that outdo their Android counterparts.

10. The iTunes Media Store

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android While iOS still doesn’t allow you to sync wirelessly, you can, at least, use your Wi-Fi (and in some cases cellular data) connection to purchase and download music, video, and books over the air. While Android’s not without Amazon’s media offerings, Apple gives you access to an enormous library of entertainment that you can purchase in a few taps. Everything you buy is sent to it corresponding app and transferred over to your computer the next time you sync. The process is seamless. When it comes to buying media for your device, there’s really no better implementation.

*Personal note: I greatly prefer Amazon to iTunes for several reasons, but I think that Apple’s implementation of the iTunes store is far better because of how simple and well-integrated it is.

9. AirPlay

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes AndroidThere are plenty of alternatives to Apple’s AirPlay, but none that work quite so elegantly and intuitively. Out of the box, AirPlay doesn’t really seem all that useful if you don’t own other Apple devices but there are actually several ways to make your non-Apple devices AirPlay compatible. Two-tap video streaming that actually works really well is pretty great, and you won’t find such a nice solution on Android.

8. Find My iPhone

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android It’s not like you can’t roll your own device-tracking setup on Android, but now that Find My iPhone (or iPad or iPod touch) is free it’s no longer the best paid option—it’s just the best. It’s simple to use, it’s easy to track your phone, and it has even helped people catch criminals when the loss was a result of theft (like this or this, for example). It’s been proven effective and costs you nothing. There’s not much more you need.

7. A Better Support System

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android What happens if your Android phone breaks? There are a few answers to that question, but often times it means dealing with your specific carrier. They didn’t make your phone and they have many different kinds of devices to support. Neither of those things are in your favor. What about your iPhone or other iDevice? You take it to an Apple Store or call Apple tech support. Often times you can make a Genius Bar appointment and get your issue resolved right away (assuming that problem isn’t the total obliteration of the hardware). If you’ve ever tried to get tech support at a Verizon store, for example, you know how frustrating that can be. Apple’s support team—while not perfect—is one of the best there is.

6. Better Battery Life and Management

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android Over the past few years, Apple’s started to consider battery life to be one of the most important features of its products. This is especially evident in the iPad, which contains around as much battery as humans contain water, but it’s also Apple’s battery management tactics that make this possible. Some may be disappointed that the lack of true multitasking is lost in the name of power economy, but true multitasking isn’t all that great when you device dies because it ran out of juice. While it didn’t start off that way, the latest batch of devices running iOS will get you through the day (and sometimes longer). That’s not always something you can count on with Android.

5. iTunes and Tethered Syncing

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android iTunes is a behemoth of a media manager but it handles a lot of data as it goes from your computer to your iDevice and back again. It has an enormous amount of responsibility for those who do sync with their computers. You can certainly argue that DoubleTwist brings the features of iTunes to Android, but the fact of the matter is that an application needed to be created to bring iTunes to Android. Android is missing iTunes in the same way iOS is missing Android’s wireless capabilities.

*Personal note: I really don’t like iTunes, but I think it’s hard to argue that there’s anything that does what it does as well. It is a very ambitious piece of software that doesn’t work as well as I’d like it to, but I do appreciate the difficulty of creating something like it. While there are definitely other great music players, there really isn’t anything else that can do everything iTunes can do (even if it often fails to do some of those things well).

4. No Crapware

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android Sure, you can pick up the Nexus S and get a phone with no added applications and have an Android phone without any crapware added by the manufacturer, but most people aren’t getting their Android phones from Google. When you buy your Android phone from a particular carrier, you can often to expect a few apps you won’t want and can’t get rid of. With iOS you just get iOS. While Apple might be a little overprotective at times, their walled garden is not without its upsides. It’s nice buying an iDevice with the knowledge you won’t get stuck with a Sprint NASCAR app you don’t want.

3. A Bigger and Better Variety of Apps

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android While the iTunes App Store is never going to sell classic game console emulators and other questionable apps—and that’s a shame—there is, on average, more money to make when developing for iOS. The downside is that most apps cost a bit of money, but it’s rarely more than a couple of dollars. The upside is that developers who make money are more likely to be able to afford to spend time developing. The gold mine that is the iTunes App Store has also attracted plenty of big name game developers who’ve brought some pretty amazing titles to iOS. Sometimes a little money can go a long way, and it does with apps. iOS has some of the most elegant, polished, fun, and even useful apps. They may be a bit more restricted than Android apps, but it’s not like you can’t jailbreak if you’re looking for more.

2. A Well-Designed, Intuitive User Interface

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android Whether you like Apple’s hardware and software or not, it’s hard to argue that they aren’t beautifully designed. Apple puts a lot of thought in the design of the interface, from its looks to its ease of use. iOS’ user experience is one of the most intuitive. Android can take some time to figure out, and there’s a lack of consistency in the way third-party apps operate, but if you give someone an iOS device they’ll generally be able to figure out much of the functionality on their own. People are posting videos of their very young children using iPads. Android ends up with sites like this (which isn’t representative of the platform and a bit much, but still makes a point). iOS is nice to look at and easy to learn, welcoming pretty much everyone to the party.

1. Consistency

Top 10 Ways iOS Outdoes Android iOS is nothing if not consistent. When you pick up an iOS device, you know exactly what you’re getting. This shouldn’t come as a surprise from a company like Apple, who likes to control every aspect of their products. When it comes to receiving major feature updates, you get them on a fairly regular schedule. While there’s some update fragmentation with iOS, it’s only ever been between phones and tablets. With Android, it’s between the many, many different phones as well as fragmentation between phones and tablets. Knowing what you’re getting and that you’ll be receiving updates for at least the next two generations of devices increases the value of an iDevice long past the date of purchase.


You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter and Facebook.  If you’d like to contact him, Twitter is the most effective means of doing so.

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Android Soars to Number 1, Gets 36% Of Smartphone Sales This Year

Gartner, one of the world’s leading IT Research and Advisory companies, have just published their new market trend findings for the worldwide mobile phone market for this past year Q1 2010 to Q1 2011. Android is clearly on a dominating pattern, and smartphones have gained a larger popularity since the past year. HTC and Samsung are also enjoying most of the newfound Android users as they’re the largest risers in the past 12 months.

Gartner estimates that Android is now 36% of all smartphone sales this past year ending Q1 2011, with Symbian trailing at 27%, iOS at 17% and RIM close behind at 13%. This is a huge change from last year’s Android 10%, Symbian 44%, iOS 15%, and RiM at 20%. Most of the new Android adopters have jumped from Symbian and RiM, as these OSes have been widely known to be already long-in-the-tooth.

Smartphones in general are now a major trend, going up to 23.6% of all mobile phone sales – an 85% increase since last year. Samsung experienced its strongest first quarter ever – no doubt fueled by its various Galaxy variants worldwide. HTC, one of the original Android players is also experiencing high growth, moving onto the world’s number 7 spot – while it reached 2nd place in the US market early this year.

Through strong device adoption and a great range of hardware configurations and innovative features, Android has become, and is clearly enjoying, massive growth and leading the smartphone race into the future. Competitors like the iOS ecosystem still have a legacy lead, but given its horizontal movement, will be overtaken soon. Things are looking up for us, indeed.

Source: Gartner

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